Last Days Of Queen Amina – by Davi’O R. Seki (Chapter 2)

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Last days of Queen Amins

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Last Days Of Queen Amina

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The fall of the mighty Queen

By Davi’O R. Seki.

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Chapter 2

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At the crack of dawn of the following day, Auta and Tanko went out to get a feel of the new city. They usually did this after every conquest. They were of blue blood. They had been friends with Amina since childhood. So many tales have been told of the warrior queen, but only these two could tell of her wonderful adventures as a child. She did not have any other friends.
Once, they went on a hunt and the trio came by a leopard. While Auta and Tanko proposed to run away as fast as they could to avoid being torn apart by the beast in sight, Amina was willing to stand her ground and fight the animal. Which she did and just as Amina began to wrestle it, Auta and Tanko ran back into the village to get help. Her father, too old and weak to go with the party, sent some of the warriors with the boys and they went in the direction of where Amina wrestled this animal.
Auta and Tanko ran as fast as they could, leading the men towards Amina and the leopard. They feared that only little would be left of her by the time they got there. As they got closer to the place, they found Amina standing beside the leopard. It was dead. The boys were both shocked and happy, as they were filled with excitement that their friend did not die after all. The warriors, even though they saw Amina as a woman who was like a man, refused to believe she killed the leopard. They assumed the leopard had already died, and in order to improve Amina’s records the three had planned this to happen. It was then assumed that since the leopard had no obvious wounds, and Amina herself didn’t have any scratch on her, the leopard died a natural death. So she connived with Auta and Tanko, asking them run to the village to draw the people’s attention to her standing beside the dead animal so that she would be praised.
“I strangled it! I strangled it from behind!” Amina would try to defend herself, but they will not believe a little girl’s words.
This accusation made her father feel ashamed and she was never allowed to go out to hunt until she was much older. Her mother believed her side of the story. While Zaria did not care at all, but was only concerned her sister was safe, Karama, their brother would tease Amina with this for a long time.
Auta was always known as the feeble hearted son of the Sarkin Fada of Zauzzau. He was the last son amongst fourteen children. He was often teased by people that his manliness had been taken from him and handed to Amina by the creator. He was, even with his feeble heartedness, skilled with the flute and his music could make a stick get up to dance. Amina loved it when he played the flute. He often used it to praise her courage and strength and gave her extra morale each time she was going to war against another village. His magic with the flute was not the only thing that drew attention to him.

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